"New modules"
#1
I started this project some years ago, and "other things" decided to take precedence over the construction. I've decided to try to have these done by next (2010) July, in time to possibly be at the NMRA convention "National Train Show" in Milwaukee, Wi.
This would be a good time to document the "build", and include any of the tips, tricks, techniques I have used, or have recently learned and will use, here.
I had posted these two shots on another forum. The first is the basic 30" X 48" modules ( three) that will make up the "set".    

This next shot, shows somewhat the process I use of "place and move" details, buildings, etc. to get a "pleasing", somewhat more "realistic" layout of the features, before "locking" everything down.    

The "I beam" bench and leg assemblies will go with the modules to support them. I chose this because I had to make the modules so shallow to permit dual gauge operation below the level of the "standard" mainline trackage.
The white, suitcase sized box, under the modules is the case I use to transport (by checked baggage on the airline) thirty pieces of rolling stock, and three locomotives, back when I would go out to San Diego for equipment training in my old job. I'd spend my weekends running the train on the San Diego Model Railroad Club's layout in the Balboa Park, San Diego Model Railroad Museum. I haven't forgotten the hospitality of that group in letting me "come in and play".
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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#2
This is the current drawing. only the right hand module has detail, because I haven't settled on the placement of buildings, bridges, "land masses", etc. Once I'm satisfied with those items, I'll include them in the drawings.

   
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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#3
Yesterday afternoon, I shot these pictures....there has been some progress but not much, until very recently. the first shot is basically all three modules as they are right now.    
Next is the left hand module. In this shot you can clearly see the 10" "back table" that completes the dual gauge loops. there will be "skyboards between the modules and the back tables, so they won't be seen when the modules are displayed.    
This is the center module of the set.The pieces of stripwood that appear to be "just lying there", are used to get a feel for the grade of the land that will eventually be there. By using the strips, I can get an early idea of where to start and finish the "land mass", so it looks natural, while not taking up too much space. It helps when locating buildings, roads, etc.    
And this is the right hand module. On this one, I have the four stall roundhouse, kit bashed from two Revell engine houses. The scratchbuilt sand tower, a wood, 100 ton coal tower kit from Alexander scale models, and a modified Atlas water tank. the turn table is from Heljan    

On the left and center modules I'm using the kit bashed Ship Chandler's shop, and Shipwright's shop, a scrach built small freight house ( I built this one 48 years ago ), and what was intended to be a pickle factory I built 40 years ago for a friend. It came back to me when he passed away a couple of years ago. There will also be six of the Life Like Scene master steel arch bridge kits, to carry the mainline track over the water, which is most of the left and center modules.
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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#4
It's nice to see your working on those again Pete.
I've been working with the Mountain Valley Ntrak group who are going to be setting up at the Depot in Williams AZ. for the Grand Canyon Railway's event next month.
I'm not sure if we will make it to the convention next year or not.
Ray Marinaccio
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#5
That's pretty cool. :tada:

How does the track set up work? Is the lower oval run independantly of the double track on top or is there a way for a train on the oval to get to the double track?
Life should not be a journey to the grave with intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke thoroughly used up totally worn out and loudly proclaiming
WOW! What a ride! H.S.Thompson
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#6
That is pretty neat! What a great water scene that will make.
Mark

Citation Latitude Captain
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#7
Love the bridges!
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Kevin
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#8
tetters Wrote:That's pretty cool. :tada:
How does the track set up work? Is the lower oval run independantly of the double track on top or is there a way for a train on the oval to get to the double track?

These are "round and round" display modules. The double tracks are the two required "loop" tracks. the lower level will be dual gauge, across the front, with only narrow gauge crossing in front of the skyboards. The standard gauge part of the loop will cross behind the skyboards. I intend to mix standard, and narrow gauge trains through the visible areas, and may provide "staging" for two of each, as in 1. standard "east" 2. narrow "west" 3. Narrow "east" 4. Standard "west", or in any order I choose. What the viewers will see will be four different trains running through the scene.

( Round and round modular display layout: Operators can set their trains running, and then be able to talk with the show attendees. Hard to do smoothly when having to concentrate on "operations".
Operating modular display layout: Operators have a hard time conversing with the show attendees because of "operating constraints", and little or no information is passed along to those who would like to learn.
It's time, and manpower consuming to try to have the best of both worlds. )
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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#9
Too many things going on, but, ......
The basic theme for these modules is a "Seaport and Maritime Museum" set somewhere in the Northeast. This is what I've got so far.    

The four buildings are all Atlas kits starting at the left with the "Restaurant/Gift Shop" Atlas "Roadside Inn" kit, with a little modification. The dark gray/white paint will be used on all "Museum" buildings.    
Next is the Boat Shop, which was a single "depot" kit;    
The Ship Chandler shop, which has been done for several years, is a bash of two depot kits, and the small Shipwright's shed is one of the "platforms" with scratch built walls;    
I've got them set "in place" and will keep moving them around until I like the arrangement.....this while other work goes on.
I have decided to remove the short loop of narrow gauge that came in, and exited, through the skyboard, to make more room for the "waterfront" scene.    
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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#10
The Bridges are AWESOME! And that boat is impressive!! Great work Pete :tada: :tada:
Josh Mader

Maders Trains
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#11
Trucklover Wrote:The Bridges are AWESOME! And that boat is impressive!! Great work Pete :tada: :tada:
"That Boat".......It was an Ideal Models, die cut, and carved balsa kit of the "Alexander Hamilton", a "Revenue Cutter", that I built more years ago than I care to mention.
The important thing is not the model itself, but what it became.
I have always had a connection with the sea, and sailing ships. I have built several models, and have always tried to improve my skills with rigging. "That Boat" has been the testbed for all of the different rigging techniques I've ever learned. Any time I wanted to develop a new technique, it got tried out on "That Boat"...........it's been rebuilt several times in the more-than-forty-years since the first assembly of the kit.
I have.......learned a lot... from "That Boat".
In addition to it, there are three (for now) new, smaller, sailing craft under construction, a 62' two mast coastal schooner, a 48' gaff rigged cutter, and a 24' Friendship sloop.
In the photo of the Ship chandler shop, you can see the bow of a 54' Chesapeake Bay "Skipjack", a sail powered oyster dredge.
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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#12
I gotta agree. "That Boat" is very nice. The maritime theme is a nice one to go with as well. :tada:
Life should not be a journey to the grave with intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke thoroughly used up totally worn out and loudly proclaiming
WOW! What a ride! H.S.Thompson
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#13
To complete the structure list for the "seaport end of the set" there is a pickle factory, and a small freight house.    
The freight house was built in the early sixties. The pickle factory, is a two piece project. The tanks and surrounding structure completed in 1969, and the storage building/office a couple of years later. The two were united when the first part was returned by the person it was built for, in 2006.
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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#14
new, smaller, sailing craft under construction, a 62' two mast coastal schooner, a 48' gaff rigged cutter, and a 24' Friendship sloop.    
The coastal schooner ( red hull) is mostly wood construction on a plastic hull from a Lindberg kit of an 1800's "privateer schooner". The "Cutter" is the Pyro "Fishing Schooner Elsie" hull, with all scratch styrene deck, cabin,and hatch, spars are wood. The "friendship sloop" is the Bluejacket "Harbor & Ocean" (HO) kit #303.
All the masts, booms,gaffs,etc. started out with square wood stock, which was tapered, rounded, and shaped as necessary.
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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#15
I've always been a big fan of your bridges and ships! :tada:
Ralph
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