"New modules"
#46
Very intricate work there, S250. Your water scenes still amaze and inspire me. Thumbsup
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#47
Here, the Bridge tender's shack, on the platform, with the piling bents for the walk bridges, and bridges.
They are set in a length of 1/4" plywood with holes drilled for all the pilings, which have been stained to represent creosoted wood. The Plywood piece, is clamped to the larger board to keep it straight and level, and will be used to transfer the hole pattern to the water area of the modules. The bridges etc., can be installed once the holes are drilled.
   
In this shot the upper roof of the Tender's shack. I wanted to show the ridge lines, as they have not had caps installed. Don't think the camera can pick out that detail ( yes I've done some more shingling )
   
Here, the basic tools for shingling, I tilted the cut pad so things could be seen better, and had to remove the Xacto knife, and glue applicator, as they rolled away. The tools are: a 12" scale rule, to measure, and to guide the cutting of the strips. A small pair of scissors, to cut the strips into individual shingles. A pair of fine point tweezers, and a "recycled" dental pick, to hold and position the shingle in place. The glue applicator is a small syringe, with a blunt needle, and I use a standard Xacto handle with a #11 blade for cutting the strips. The pencil marks the line for the next course of shingles.
   
If I can get better detail with this camera, I'll show and explain how to cut the ridge cap shingles.
Next, though, I have to complete the second bridge, and start / finish the third.
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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#48
Expanded Aluminum Gutter Screen...to keep the "junk" out of the rain gutters...to make scenery out of ? It's relatively inexpensive, light weight ( I have to carry these modules up and down the basement stairs ), needs the following tools: 1. Staple gun w/ 1/2" staples, 2. tin snips / sheers to cut it, 3. twist ties ( from the plastic garbage bags that I always tie with a knot ), 4. a clamping hemostat ( helps for twisting the twist ties )
The neatest thing about this stuff is that it is "self supporting", "visible" ( so you can see its shape ) and.....it is "adjustable", so you can get the shape right.
It's easy to use, staple at the edges, twist tie pieces together, stretch / compress as needed to shape.
Once I have the shape right, it gets a layer of plaster cloth, then a layer of hydrocal ( brushed on, semi thin, two coats ). When dry and hard, a coat of "earth color" latex paint is applied, and allowed to dry, then, a heavy coat is applied a small patch at a time, and "ground cover" is sprinkled over, and gently pressed into the thick wet paint.
The depression to the left of the "pickle factory", is where I will use the waterfall technique, posted http://www.the-gauge.net/forum/viewtopic...=53&t=1760 by Steve.
    . Sheet foam is used where buildings, etc. will be placed...they need firmer anchors as these are modules, and will be transported many times in their lives.
Some of that foam work can be seen on this, the "engine facility" module.
   
Yes, I modified the sand tower so that it and the sand shed are at the same level. It works better in this scene than at "hill-side", and yes, that is the "Spring Challenge" work train, behind the SHLC 2-6-6-2T.
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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#49
Three more shots, taken from the left ( North ) end of the modules looking South. I was able to create better lighting for these shots....almost as much work as building the scene! :o
The first is the Seaport-museum warf;
   
This looks South along the bridges.
   
Here, an overall view.
   
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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#50
Confusedhock:

Those water scenes and ships are some kind of fantastic! Definitely a unique layout, Sir.

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#51
Gary S Wrote:Those water scenes and ships are some kind of fantastic!

I'm going with either awesome fantastic or stupendous fantastic...! Wink Thumbsup Thumbsup


Andrew
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#52
Andrew, we've narrowed it down to two. Either Stupendous fantastic or awesome fantastic works for me. Seriously, the masts of the ships and all the rigging towering above the layout really is a sight to behold.
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#53
Cheers

Andrew
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#54
You have managed to combine two totally different modeling subjects into one "whole" scene. Fantastic work..!! Thumbsup

Boats are almost on a par with trains as far as I'm concerned.... Goldth
Gus (LC&P).
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#55
Cheers and those good-looking ships really set the mood of the whole scene.

Wayne
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#56
Sweet! Thumbsup
Life should not be a journey to the grave with intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke thoroughly used up totally worn out and loudly proclaiming
WOW! What a ride! H.S.Thompson
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#57
Well, I was going to get to the hobby shop today, but after all that praise my head is swelled up too big to get through the door! Icon_lol Wink Big Grin Big Grin

"Boats are almost on a par with trains as far as I'm concerned...."


There is a reason why all my railroads are owned by the shipyard.

Thanks, all. There's still a ton of work that has to be done, before these are ready enough, to take to show. I'm still hoping to be ready for Trainfest in Milwaukee this November.
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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#58
I've been busy..........and not taken a single pic. 35 35
There's some "greenery" in a couple of places. The stone block wharf is built. Two of the three walk bridges are done ( ironwork, the wood walkways are waiting for the third bridge ). There's some "landscaping around the boathouse. A mock up of the road "tunnel" under the "mainline" tracks. and concrete retaining walls ( where I couldn't just have ground, at too steep an angle.
I'm close now to mixing the Hydrocal, and sculpting the streambed for the waterfall, at the North end of the Seaport.
I'm waiting for the "right time" to take on the frogs, and guardrails, to split the standard gauge off from the narrow gauge, so the can run separate across the back of the modules ( lets me alternate between the two, at shows. One in one direction, and the other in the opposite direction. )
The last time I played with this idea, it took several years to work the bugs out of the trackwork.
I'll try to remember to "tutorial" both the ridge cap shingles, and the Eureka bridge build.
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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#59
Progress photos.
The first is a low angle shot of the restored D&RGW #375 northbound on the dual gauge trestle. The gifthouse
( Revell Depot ) is in the background.
   
The second shot is of the brigantine, you can see part of the stone block seawall behind her.
   
This shot of the boathouse, shows some of the "greenery" and the road and concrete retaining wall, "across the street".
   
This shot is the tunnel portal for that road. The dual gauge track passes just in front, and I still have to build a grade crossing there. Traffic is held at the opposite end of the tunnel while trains pass.
   
Here, the coal tower, sand house, water tank, small freighthouse, and roundhouse. All the "Ground" work is done, with just a little bit more scenery to be added as time permits.
   
Here, the two walkbridges, painted, with temporary walkways. The third bridge is getting close to start time for the build.
   
This pickle factory has a long history....I built the "brine tanks and shed" part in 1969, the warehouse/office part in 1974. It will be just to the West side of this that the waterfall gets built. Yeah, that's the work train again.
   
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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#60
Thanks for the update, Sumpter250, you 've been making some steady progress and the workmanship is supurb! Your modules are definitely an inspiration!
biL
Lehigh Susquehanna & Western


"America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves." ~~Abraham Lincoln

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