Charlie b's layout
#1
First thing this morning I had a new kit delivered.
It is for a 24X40 pole building that will someday soon house my train layout. Track plans are in the works, but putting up the building comes first.
I will start tomorrow, but Out-back Jack is on the other side of the world so construction here will be kind of slow. It depends on how much help shows up and when. It will take one more truck load for the siding and the floor. I'm hoping the snow will be gone in a couple of days.
Charlie


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#2
Woohoo! Thumbsup
Three Foot Rule In Effect At All Times
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#3
Now that's what I call starting from scratch!
Tom

Model Conrail

PM me to get a hold of me.
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#4
Is that a styrene or basswood kit? Smile

Have fun with the build!
Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio
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#5
Another 1:1 scale structure build! How exciting.

Are you going to get a proper pad poured for it?
Life should not be a journey to the grave with intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke thoroughly used up totally worn out and loudly proclaiming
WOW! What a ride! H.S.Thompson
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#6
Fluesheet Wrote:Is that a styrene or basswood kit? Smile

Have fun with the build!

Laser cut wood kits... big money spender Icon_lol
Tom

Model Conrail

PM me to get a hold of me.
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#7
Allllll right!!!!! Happy constructing Charlie!!! Thumbsup
Ralph

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#8
That's great news to hear, Charlie, but between you and Gary, you're giving the rest of us "layout building envy". Icon_lol Icon_lol

Wayne
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#9
tetters Wrote:Another 1:1 scale structure build! How exciting.

Are you going to get a proper pad poured for it?
That is the beauty of a pole building, you don't need a concrete floor, the poles are put in below the frost line and you don't even have to level the ground real well, you just have to start the siding level . The kit includes skirting to use where the siding is a little higher off the ground.
My legs can't take being on concrete for more than a few minutes so I am putting down a wood floor that will eventually have the soft rubber matting. (the floor will be up off the ground.)
I could have gotten the steel roof and siding a little cheaper, but that kit would only have trusses on 4 foot centers, and open steel will sweat to the point water drips, so I would have had to buy extra trusses, and with the wood/shingles there is a tiny bit more R factor.
I have figured 8 inches of insulation in the walls, which will be about R24 and blown in for the ceiling to about R40. There will be a vapor barrier under the floor too.
Charlie
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#10
Hello Charlie---isn't retirement great---you can spend your time doing things you enjoy---looks like you're going to be keeping busy---looking forward to following your progress
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#11
Well Nutbar. I've got the stakes in for the level lines and I'm waiting for help to arrive to mark the location of the 4 corner posts. The instructions are about as clear as mud, but I think I have it figured out.
The building is built with outside girts so the posts have to be set in 1 1/2 inches from the corners to allow for the girts. at least I figured that out first, and wont have a 3 inch piece of wood siding, although I have a lot of rough cut 1x6 hemlock that would fill the gap and add decor. I may do that anyway.
That will give me a total wall thickness of 8 1/2 inches, so there will be lots of room for insulation.
I have built a lot of buildings using conventional construction, but only one with pole construction, and that was the train station in Schenley, and it was built from scratch, however we did have the old foundation to work from.
Charlie
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#12
Charlie B Wrote:
tetters Wrote:Another 1:1 scale structure build! How exciting.

Are you going to get a proper pad poured for it?
That is the beauty of a pole building, you don't need a concrete floor, the poles are put in below the frost line and you don't even have to level the ground real well, you just have to start the siding level . The kit includes skirting to use where the siding is a little higher off the ground.
My legs can't take being on concrete for more than a few minutes so I am putting down a wood floor that will eventually have the soft rubber matting. (the floor will be up off the ground.)
I could have gotten the steel roof and siding a little cheaper, but that kit would only have trusses on 4 foot centers, and open steel will sweat to the point water drips, so I would have had to buy extra trusses, and with the wood/shingles there is a tiny bit more R factor.
I have figured 8 inches of insulation in the walls, which will be about R24 and blown in for the ceiling to about R40. There will be a vapor barrier under the floor too.
Charlie

I should have guessed. I have plans for a 10 x 12 tool shed in my backyard that will be built on concrete footings as well with a wood floor just off the ground.

Just out of curiousness, how many footings will you have to pour to support your building?
Life should not be a journey to the grave with intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke thoroughly used up totally worn out and loudly proclaiming
WOW! What a ride! H.S.Thompson
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#13
Charlie B Wrote:
tetters Wrote:Another 1:1 scale structure build! How exciting.

Are you going to get a proper pad poured for it?
That is the beauty of a pole building, you don't need a concrete floor, the poles are put in below the frost line and you don't even have to level the ground real well, you just have to start the siding level . The kit includes skirting to use where the siding is a little higher off the ground.
My legs can't take being on concrete for more than a few minutes so I am putting down a wood floor that will eventually have the soft rubber matting. (the floor will be up off the ground.)
I could have gotten the steel roof and siding a little cheaper, but that kit would only have trusses on 4 foot centers, and open steel will sweat to the point water drips, so I would have had to buy extra trusses, and with the wood/shingles there is a tiny bit more R factor.
I have figured 8 inches of insulation in the walls, which will be about R24 and blown in for the ceiling to about R40. There will be a vapor barrier under the floor too.
Charlie

Charlie, looks great. I just thought I'd mention to you that we put an Ikea floating "click type" floor in the master bedroom remodel. They use a foam material for an underlayment that is about 1/8 inch thick. We also used the same flooring in a dining room that we enlarged and eliminated slate flooring from the original construction. The rest of the house has hardwood flooring except the Bathrooms which have tile. You would not think that 1/8 inch of foam would make that much difference, but when you step from the existing hardwood to the floating floor, the difference is amazing. You might find that a floating floor has enough give that you don't need the rubber mats. By the way, our house is on a raised foundation. Newer construction out here is slab on grade, but our house was originally built in the 1950's. The sub floor on the new addition is plywood with the floating floor over the top.
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#14
Teeters, there are no footings poured. you place the post bottoms on something solid, like a concrete block in the bottom of the hole, then you nail "anchors" which are 4 treated 2x4's about a foot long, 1/4 of an inch from the bottom of the post, one on each side, these serve as wind anchors to give more wind stability, then you tamp the ground in as you fill the hole. another method is to use dry concrete mix to tamp around the posts (Which I am using) The concrete will get wet and harden on its own.
You don't want to set the posts too firm or fill the holes until you are sure they are set in the right location.
They have been building barns with this method for years and the only ones I've seen a problem with are the ones where they try to cut corners with the framing.
Our locomotive shed was built with the trusses on 4 foot centers, and I was always worried about snow load, but the snow slid off the metal roof pretty quick so wasn't a problem. I'm using 24 inch centers which seems to be the norm here with truss construction and a shingled roof.
There are plans here <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.public.iastate.edu/~mwps_dis/mwps_web/plans/72057.pdf">http://www.public.iastate.edu/~mwps_dis ... /72057.pdf</a><!-- m -->. It is not the one I'm building, but the technique is similar.
Charlie
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#15
Dear Russ,
Thanks for the input. The flooring I am refering to is an interlocking rubber floor that looks like diamond plate. You just lay it without any glue and if you need to change a section you just lift them out. They are 2x2 feet. I will probably just use them in the asileways which will cut down on the amount I'll have to buy. We found them at Big Lots and they were 4 for 12 bucks or 6 for 15 bucks. (easy to cut too.)
We put them down in the railroad office before I left and they are a real treat for these old feet to walk on, and were very easy to vaccumn.
Charlie
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