GERN Industries rolling stock...
#31
Wayne will assign numbers for you, he has everything under control. Just PM him with your car type(S)
Charlie
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#32
The two GERN covered hoppers shown in the first photo of this thread have been re-built and re-numbered. The re-building was mainly to replace the overly heavy cast-on grab irons and sill steps, but I also redid the hatches and outlet gates using parts from Bowser's nicely-done ACF covered hoppers. Since the MDC cars represented Pullman-Standard's PS-2, the new hybrid has been deemed a GERN corporate design, with features of both the PS-2 and ACF designs. Since the GERN design pre-dates that of the latter two companies, both of those companies pay royalties to GERN for the features they later opted to use.
GERN's cars were built by National Steel Car, in Hamilton, Ontario.
The re-numbering came about when GERN acquired additional cars from the now-moribund Niagara Peninsula RR, and shop forces discovered that their supply of the numeral "5" in the proper font had been almost exhausted.

Here's the two re-done originals...
[Image: REBUILT%20MDC%20COVERED%20HOPPERS...%20015.jpg]

[Image: REBUILT%20MDC%20COVERED%20HOPPERS...%20017.jpg]

...and the recent additions, simply patched-over for the new reporting marks and numbers:

[Image: REBUILT%20MDC%20COVERED%20HOPPERS...%20018.jpg]

[Image: REBUILT%20MDC%20COVERED%20HOPPERS...%20019.jpg]

Also done at the same shopping were these EG&E cars...

[Image: REBUILT%20MDC%20COVERED%20HOPPERS...%20014.jpg]

[Image: REBUILT%20MDC%20COVERED%20HOPPERS...%20016_1.jpg]

Wayne
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#33
That's what happened at the KJR. I numbered the flat car 44. The boss wanted to now why I chose 44, I told him the caboose was KJR 4 so I had to use two 4's and 4 was the only stencil I had. Icon_lol I was going to number the coach 4444 but I found some more stencils in time. Wink
Charlie
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#34
What would the marks look like in 1900?
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#35
MountainMan Wrote:What would the marks look like in 1900?

I'm not sure, but they wouldn't likely have been on covered hoppers. Wink Misngth
Back in those days, I don't think that the regulations would have been too stringent: probably the name of the car's owner, for instance, UNION PACIFIC, or the appropriate U.P. initials, and the car's number, but I don't think that any particular placement was proscribed. I couldn't find much in the way of on-line prototype photos, but most of the other data which we see nowadays could be placed almost anywhere on the car (if it appeared at all). Many cars also featured advertising, either for the owner road or for important on-line customers - this pre-dated the era of the so-called "billboard reefers", but was similar.

There's some info HERE on more recent lettering requirements for freight cars.

Wayne
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#36
Nope - no covered hoppers. Open ore cars or gons. Could also be box cars with the Gern in sacks, the way high grade gold ore was shipped out from Cripple Creek to the refinery, or in solution in a tank car. They were around in this area in the late 1800's when Florence was having its oil boom.
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#37
There were also a lot of bulk commodities shipped in boxcars. Grain was an obvious one, but ore, coal, coke....pretty much anything that required protection from the elements and which could be moved in and out of the car using shovels...were common. Some facilities existed for tipping the cars to aid in loading and unloading using mechanical means.

Loading coke using shovels

Loading gold ore concentrate using shovels

Tipping a car to unload grain

Wayne
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#38
Speaking of which, what does GERN ore look like? And after it is processed into a solid form?
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#39
MountainMan Wrote:Speaking of which, what does GERN ore look like? And after it is processed into a solid form?

The ore will vary in colour (color) depending on the location of the mine and it's said those colours may rival that of a prism. This is good news for modellers, as your location's ore colour is likely exactly the same as what you plan to use to represent the ore. Supposedly, the processing (and there are many methods used, depending on the end product desired) may cause the colour to change, but the colour can also be manipulated during the refining process. The mine of my Gibson Works, beneath nearby Lake Erie, produces mainly grey ore, and ships both powdered and granulated flux, along with pelletised varieties. The first two account for most of the weathering on the hoppers, but the raw ore never leaves the premises, as the entire operation is self-contained. Gibson Works also produces a lot of liquid flux products, but apparently no one outside the plant has knowledge of what colours might be involved, and tank car loading appears to be done very neatly, with no visible spillage. Eek

Wayne
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#40
doctorwayne Wrote:
MountainMan Wrote:Speaking of which, what does GERN ore look like? And after it is processed into a solid form?

The ore will vary in colour (color) depending on the location of the mine and it's said those colours may rival that of a prism. This is good news for modellers, as your location's ore colour is likely exactly the same as what you plan to use to represent the ore. Supposedly, the processing (and there are many methods used, depending on the end product desired) may cause the colour to change, but the colour can also be manipulated during the refining process. The mine of my Gibson Works, beneath nearby Lake Erie, produces mainly grey ore, and ships both powdered and granulated flux, along with pelletised varieties. The first two account for most of the weathering on the hoppers, but the raw ore never leaves the premises, as the entire operation is self-contained. Gibson Works also produces a lot of liquid flux products, but apparently no one outside the plant has knowledge of what colours might be involved, and tank car loading appears to be done very neatly, with no visible spillage. Eek

Wayne

That's odd...according to the "GERN Rules", the spillage may be either 3% more or 3% less than usual, but it still has to be there, and the processing factory has to know what color it is when finished, but... 8-)

So basically it's Player's Rules...thanks. I have the perfect ore already on hand, if I don;t use it for the primary resource...but then, I have a rock shop at the Royal Gorge than can give me whatever I want. Thumbsup
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#41
MountainMan Wrote:That's odd...according to the "GERN Rules", the spillage may be either 3% more or 3% less than usual, but it still has to be there, and the processing factory has to know what color it is when finished, but... 8-)

I'm sure that the factory knows, but nobody there is talking. Goldth


MountainMan Wrote:So basically it's Player's Rules...thanks. I have the perfect ore already on hand, if I don;t use it for the primary resource...but then, I have a rock shop at the Royal Gorge than can give me whatever I want. Thumbsup

Yeah, Player's Rules. Thumbsup I wanted GERN to be accessible to anyone interested in it, so other than asking GERN modellers to contact me for suitable numbers for GERN rolling stock (simply to avoid having duplicate numbers), it's pretty much up to each individual to make their GERN suit their needs. Hopefully, it'll add at least 3% more enjoyment to their model railroading.

Wayne
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#42
Works for me. There is some exotic stuff available form the rock shop. Thumbsup
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#43
MountainMan Wrote:....There is some exotic stuff available form the rock shop. Thumbsup

If you plan on using some of it to represent flux ore, I hope that you'll post some photos to show it. At one time, before the layout I have now, I thought about bringing in ore from a mine somewhere else (probably unmodelled), but dropped the idea because a train of ore cars wasn't in the budget. It never occurred to me at the time that ore might have travelled in regular open hoppers (of which I had quite a few). 35
The Gibson Works mine is supposedly under nearby Lake Erie, and that locale was inspired by the salt mines at Goderich, Ont., which extend well out under Lake Huron.

Wayne
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#44
doctorwayne Wrote:
MountainMan Wrote:....There is some exotic stuff available form the rock shop. Thumbsup

If you plan on using some of it to represent flux ore, I hope that you'll post some photos to show it. At one time, before the layout I have now, I thought about bringing in ore from a mine somewhere else (probably unmodelled), but dropped the idea because a train of ore cars wasn't in the budget. It never occurred to me at the time that ore might have travelled in regular open hoppers (of which I had quite a few). 35
The Gibson Works mine is supposedly under nearby Lake Erie, and that locale was inspired by the salt mines at Goderich, Ont., which extend well out under Lake Huron.

Wayne

Be sure others know the choice so if we would like we can model the same style.

WOW, I just ran into this page and I'm loving it. Wayne has been emailing me for years about the goings on at GERN but I didn't know how well the biz has grown. I will for sure be adding a GERN to my layout and now I know it will be in detail. I'm having my layout focused on a quarry and cement plant and was thinking of a asphalt plant too. The asphalt could be GERN pavement. A new improved way to travel. 35% smoother roads. 10% longer lasting tires. The ideas can fly as I think of a red based asphalt because the rocks used or the tar is GERN FLUX or ... HOW FUN!

Has there been many ideas or modeling done of the modern GERN. Fast Forward to 2020 and GERN is a business grown beyond what could have ever been imagined.

Dave
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#45
railbuilderdhd Wrote:.....Has there been many ideas or modeling done of the modern GERN. Fast Forward to 2020 and GERN is a business grown beyond what could have ever been imagined.

Each modeller is free to interpret GERN as best suits their interests. It's meant to be a fun thing (it actually started back in the '50s as a sideshow to a table hockey league that my brother Steven and I created. We each had several teams with made-up names and named players - not real ones. We kept scoring and goaltending statistics, and had playoffs and final series after each "season". One of his star players was a centre named Cookie Gibson, and Steven, always very imaginative, let it be known that Cookie, when not scoring goals, was a "flux magnate", and CEO of GERN Industries.)

Almost all of the GERN-related stuff springs from his fertile (related to fertiliser, I guess) mind. When I started building my current layout, I decided to drag GERN out of that past, as it seemed to me that a GERN processing plant could be a great traffic generator.
There are GERN facilities, both large and small, in several different eras, including, I think, present day. One of the largest is that of Gary S (currently taking a bit of a holiday from model railroading), but even a GERN factory in a 'phone booth could generate dozens of carloads daily if you so choose.
Have fun with it - it'll make your model railroading at least 3% better. The only requirement is, should you choose to create GERN rolling stock, that you contact me for car numbers - this is only to prevent duplicates. The list of cars wearing GILX reporting marks currently totals 113 cars of various types.

Wayne
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