Huber Breaker, Ashley, Pa
#1
[Image: 39e7ef1c.jpg]
Tom

Model Conrail

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#2
I'll add a few from our trip ...            


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 My other car is a locomotive, ARHS restoration crew  
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#3
I showed the first photo to my daughter -- she wondered why it hadn't been torn down rather then be left to decay, that there was money in the recyclables. I told her that the stuff inside was too big to be hauled away to the recycler's place. She said it could be taken apart first. I told her the parts were still too big ... it would require a BIG crane! (... she' cannot even imaging an 86" cast iron driver with a sweated-on "tire" on a steam engine ... she's never seen anything bigger than a ten-wheeler at Strasburg, PA!) The last photo goes a long way for me to prove my point about the stuff being too big. Thanks!

But now ... a question ... if the breaker is in Ashley, PA, how does it get that name? It is the name of my infant grandson's *#@!*#~%*! father who already has a 22yr. old daughter, an 11yr. old daughter and now a 6mo. old son -- all three by different women, and at 42, the dullard was living with his parents until my 23yr.old daughter got her own place!! I can't even type that name! Why must the breaker be named a name I'd rather not even look at!?

I'll even have trouble coming back to this thread to see my questioned answered!
biL
Lehigh Susquehanna & Western


"America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves." ~~Abraham Lincoln

Food for Thought
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#4
That's one humongous derelict of a building.....What did it "break"..??
Gus (LC&P).
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#5
Sorry Bil I don't know where the name comes from.

Steamtrains, It breaks Anthracite coal. Soft coal, found most everywhere else uses a Tipple to sort and grade it's coal. The hard coal found in north east PA. requires heaver machinery to crush it down to marketable sizes. It has a higher BTU output than soft coal, burns with less smoke and ash, and is heaver. It's main drawback is that it needs specialised grates, a larger firebox and a strong draft or it wont burn.

   
This it the top of the main conveyor, and the top of the building, the other end leads into the mine. from this point the raw (Run of mine) coal works it's way down through different size screens and crushers until it reaches the bottom of the building where it is loaded into hoppers and sent to market. This is actually one of the smaller complexes. The ST. Nicholas one is at least twice the size of this one.
 My other car is a locomotive, ARHS restoration crew  
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#6
Steamtrains Wrote:What did it "break"..??
Gus, from what we seen inside, it's looks like it 'broke' itself. Never in my life have I seen such shotty building and cheap materials for being such a newer breaker Eek
Tom

Model Conrail

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#7
At least it didn't fall down while we were in it. 35
 My other car is a locomotive, ARHS restoration crew  
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#8
Thanks for that info...Interesting....So there is a mine nearby where the coal came from?

There's such a contrast between that little "white" town and the old derelict building....Why didn't they tear that "eyesore" down..??
Gus (LC&P).
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