The Hjemstad Line
#16
Hmm - how about one of Artitec's Norwegian fishing boats?

http://www.artitec.nl/index.php/en/artit...shing-boat


Their coastal steamer might also be a good choice (although fairly big and expensive) - seems like it is back in production:
http://www.artitec.nl/index.php/en/artit...h0-coaster

Smile,
Stein
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#17
The coaster "Nordborg" would surely be an eyecatcher, no doubt about that! Did a quick search, and the prototype was built in 1962, which would make it a little to modern for my era, but a couple of fishing boats could work.

I found several Artitec boats on the NMJ webshop that may be suitable for my layout:
http://shop.nmj.no/product_info.php?cPat...7ba42d0c70
http://shop.nmj.no/product_info.php?cPat...7ba42d0c70
http://shop.nmj.no/product_info.php?cPat...7ba42d0c70

They also have the coaster "Nordborg":
http://shop.nmj.no/product_info.php?cPat...7ba42d0c70

And, surprise, a narrow gauge railway ferry..!:
http://shop.nmj.no/product_info.php?cPat...7ba42d0c70
I wonder how big it is, and if it can be kitbashed into normal gauge...
Svein

My web page
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#18
Hmm - what about this one : (http://shop.nmj.no/product_info.php?products_id=219) - a small bulk carrying ship - about 18" (45 centimeters) long, low and narrow - fits well along an aisle. Costs about 1/3rd of the Noordborg. And it seems like NMJ has it in stock.

There are some picture of it on Chris Neward's layout here: http://www.nevardmedia5.fotopic.net/p35166331.html

Smile,
Stein
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#19
If you are looking for a large ( 127' in HO scale ) fishing boat, Lindberg's "North Atlantic Fishing Trawler" kit might be a good idea. I bashed one as a coastal freighter, and have another bash going to convert one to a small coastal collier.
this is the freighter.    
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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#20
Stein; I've been looking at that one too, not quite sure how I feel about it. Probably have to take a trip to NMJ and see if they have any of the boats on display.

S250; That is a nice looking boat! I'm not sure if an ocean going vessel like that would fit on my layout, but at that price (did a quick search, $35.99 at internethobbies.com, that's about 211 NOK, plus shipping, in todays currency) it's a very interesting option! Do you know if it comes with a full hull only, or if there's also a waterline hull included in the kit?
Svein

My web page
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#21
Svein Wrote:S250; That is a nice looking boat! I'm not sure if an ocean going vessel like that would fit on my layout, but at that price (did a quick search, $35.99 at internethobbies.com, that's about 211 NOK, plus shipping, in todays currency) it's a very interesting option! Do you know if it comes with a full hull only, or if there's also a waterline hull included in the kit?

The kit is a full hull plastic ( molded styrene ) model, I "waterlined" ( glued the two hull halves together, taped the hull to a board, with a right angle piece on the opposite side, to keep it vertically square , and ran the hull through my band saw.) it for use on my module's "water". At 127' overall length, she's an ocean going vessel, but not really trans-oceanic, a coastal freight carrier.
the kit, is an ocean going trawler.
The hull is 17.5" ( 44.5 cm ) overall length.
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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#22
Sumpter250 Wrote:The kit is a full hull plastic ( molded styrene ) model, I "waterlined" ( glued the two hull halves together, taped the hull to a board, with a right angle piece on the opposite side, to keep it vertically square , and ran the hull through my band saw.) it for use on my module's "water". At 127' overall length, she's an ocean going vessel, but not really trans-oceanic, a coastal freight carrier.
the kit, is an ocean going trawler.
The hull is 17.5" ( 44.5 cm ) overall length.

Thanks for the info, that's nice to know. What do you think about the quality and detailing, is it a good kit? I probably have to add around $20 to $30 shipping cost to the price, I haven't found that kit in any webshops here in Norway.

Svein
Svein

My web page
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#23
Svein Wrote:Thanks for the info, that's nice to know. What do you think about the quality and detailing, is it a good kit? I probably have to add around $20 to $30 shipping cost to the price, I haven't found that kit in any webshops here in Norway. Svein
The quality: Fair to Good, some flash, and some details are a bit "heavier" than they could have been. The kit has been around for some time now. I usually buy a kit like this one, as a "start", and build what I want, out of the parts. I've spent enough time around ships to know how big "things" are, and I don't hesitate to "fix the mistakes". It's not an HO scale kit, so there are some details that would need to be reworked, like doors, and the height off the deck of the port lights ( portholes ).
Where most people would probably not have any familiarity with a fishing vessel, any size problem with the "fishing hardware", would go pretty much unnoticed. It's a reasonable good kit, for a reasonable price.
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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#24
Sumpter250 Wrote:(...) It's not an HO scale kit, so there are some details that would need to be reworked, like doors, and the height off the deck of the port lights ( portholes ). (...)

Yes, I noticed the scale is 1:90 and not 1:87.1, but with a height difference of about 0.75mm on a door, would that really be noticable if one didn't have a H0 scale door nearby to compare with?

Sumpter250 Wrote:The quality: Fair to Good, some flash, and some details are a bit "heavier" than they could have been. (...) Where most people would probably not have any familiarity with a fishing vessel, any size problem with the "fishing hardware", would go pretty much unnoticed. It's a reasonable good kit, for a reasonable price.

That's what I wanted to know. Thanks, it's always better to hear from someone with first hand experience! :tada:

-- Svein
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#25
Time for some more progress pics.

The middle section is glued together and almost completed:

[Image: 1265_w1200.jpg]

[Image: 1266_w1200.jpg]

The sections are bolted together with 10x25mm bolts with washers and wingnuts. The bolts also align the sections, reducing the risk of derailing when running a train across a joint:

[Image: 1267_w1200.jpg]

Here the "water" and top piece are in place, but not yet glued to the frame. I managed to screw up when transferring the track plan onto the plywood, and have to make some minor adjustments before I can cut holes for the switch motors:

[Image: 1268_w1200.jpg]

[Image: 1269_w1200.jpg]

I interlocked the front pieces and the long cross pieces to add a little more strenght to the frame. The protruding part of the cross pieces will be cut to fit when I glue the remaining two front pieces to the frame:

[Image: 1270_w1200.jpg]

When this section is finished, I'll have to do some light spackling and sanding on both sections before painting them. I must admit that all the woodworking is getting a little boring by now, I'm looking forward to starting with the trackwork and wiring. But it's nice to see how well it's all coming together, I guess all the planning beforehand is finally paying off.

--Svein
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#26
Very fine woodwork! Did you consider to have a layer of blue foam on top? It is not so common with us here in Europe but it looks like it open lots of opportunities. The easy way to do the "foam work" instead of "wood work" Gary does for his bridges is impressive.
Reinhard
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#27
Thanks Reinhard. I'm concidering using foam on my next section, it's a lot more forgiving than plywood in case you make an error. On my previous layout attempt I used 50mm foam on top of a frame made from 22x98mm and 6mm plywood, here are a couple of pics:

[Image: test_008_w800.jpg]

[Image: test_022_w800.jpg]

Notice the hidious wallpaper in the storage room back then..!

That layout never got finished. I needed bigger curves for my brass engines, so I sold it and started planning this one instead.

Gary's work is just awesome, I'm amazed every time I look at his thread!

--Svein
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#28
Svein,

What a nice looking loop plan, and a well constructed roll-away benchwork idea. Love the pivoting layout! Very inventive.

Glad to see progress on your current layout. Nicely done.

Galen
I may not be a rivet counter, but I sure do like rivets!
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#29
Thanks, Galen. I have a rather small apartment, and needed a layout that could easily be rolled away for storage when needed to. I wanted an Inglenook puzzle, a continuous loop with a few sidings for switching, and tracks leading to the table edge for cassette staging. Here's the last trackplan I made for it (the turntable arrangement was just an idea, and was never actually realized):

[Image: Inglenook_oval_06_w1200.jpg]

The tabletop measured 105x185 cm (about 3' 5" x 6' 1") and was designed to fit through my doorways. I got the pivot idea from a layout on the Model Railroader forum, and built the legs with 48x98mm, 19x98mm crossmembers and 250x250mm wood shelf brackets. The whole assembly would come apart by just pulling out the 16mm steel tube in the center.

With a minimum radius of only 450mm (about 18"), I realized that I could never run the steam engines I desired, and that was the main reason for abandoning that layout. My current layout has a minimum radius of 600mm (about 24"), which is the recommended minimum radius for my brass models. Visually I would have preferred a larger radius, but I just don't have enough room.

--Svein
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#30
The woodworking is finally completed, and the sections are spackled and sanded on the outside for a better finish. I've also glued down the WS foam roadbed (making sure it lines up from one section to the next), and testfitted all turnouts. The remaining roadbed will be cork, sanded down to make a transition down to the plywood, this will be done after painting the sections:

[Image: 1272_w1200.jpg]

[Image: 1273_w1200.jpg]

[Image: 1274_w1200.jpg]

Svein
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