Mixed train pulled by steam loco
#1
Caught this train down at Sorumsand today, as I was heading down to the health studio for a workout - a mixed train - a steam engine (a 2-6-0T), three flat cars with various loads, four boxcars (I noticed "capacity 6 tons" stenciled on one of them), and at the rear of the train, a couple of passenger cars:

[Image: 30072011125.jpg]

[Image: 30072011137-1.jpg]

[Image: 30072011129-1.jpg]

[Image: 30072011133.jpg]

Crossing a road intersection:
[Image: 30072011139-1.jpg]

Heading up the line:
[Image: 30072011140.jpg]

Smile,
Stein
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#2
A beautiful little train...but those stunning furniture-finished wood passenger cars...remarkable ! I can't remember ever seeing that sort of work on any railroad equipment. Is it Norwegian Wood ? Bob C.
James Thurber - "It is better to know some of the questions than all of the answers."
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#3
Hi Bob --

Here are the passenger cars the UHB (Urskog-Holand Railroad) has:
http://www.u-hb.no/documents/personvogner.php

I think the cars used in this train (CFo5 and BCo3, both originally delivered to the start of the RR in 1898, and built by Skabo RR car factory in Oslo) was using some exotic kind of wood, maybe teak.

Smile,
Stein
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#4
steinjr Wrote:I think the cars used in this train (CFo5 and BCo3, both originally delivered to the start of the RR in 1898, and built by Skabo RR car factory in Oslo) was using some exotic kind of wood, maybe teak. Smile, Stein

That finish gives a whole new meaning to the term "Varnish". I won't argue the use of Teak, but the logic of using Teak is that no "finish" is required. Teak is one of the few woods, that naturally survive without a "protective coat".
Simply put, adding a decorative finish to Teak, isn't "economically logical". That said, those are still some good looking cars.

I may have missed it in previous posts, but I have to ask, is that a meter gauge railway ? The proportions of the equipment seem to support the assumption that it is.
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#5
Not totally sure what wood was used - I have heard teak, but it could be wrong.

Urskog Holandsbanen is 750 mm (just under 30") gauge.

Btw - engine actually is 2-6-2T, not 2-6-0T.

Smile,
Stein
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#6
steinjr Wrote:Urskog Holandsbanen is 750 mm (just under 30") gauge. Btw - engine actually is 2-6-2T, not 2-6-0T.
Smile, Stein

29-5/8" - - - according to the conversion table, Meters to Inches. Actually a reasonable candidate for On30 modeling

"engine actually is 2-6-2T, not 2-6-0T."
*<( mind, picturing a Bachmann, On30 2-6-0 conversion to a 2-6-2T )>*
Hmmmmm, a 2-6-0T would have been easier- - - Oh Well, there isn't all that much that's good, that's easy. Big Grin

Thanks Stein, it's still an idea that may just be pursued. Big Grin , and a 2-6-2T would be easier than the planned 2-6-6-2T with tender, for an On30 switching module. :| :?: :|
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#7
3/8" off - yeah, I'd say it's a candidate for On30 Icon_lol

--Randy
Modeling the Reading Railroad of the 1950's in HO

Visit my web site to see layout progress and other information:
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#8
Excellent shots! I assume this was a heritage train on an excursion or some kind of demonstration train?

Rob
Rob
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#9
RobertInOntario Wrote:Excellent shots! I assume this was a heritage train on an excursion or some kind of demonstration train?

Rob

Museum railroad - only 2 miles or so left of the original 30 miles of railroad.

Originally it was a a small feeder railroad, mainly for agricultural goods and lumber, but also doing passenger traffic. Known under the nickname "Tertitten" (derived from "tertiary railroad"). Financed by the local communities along the line to connect the Kongsvinger Line at Sorumsand with lake Skullerud 30 miles to the east. From Skullerud there were lakes, rivers and canals all the way down to Halden on the south coast, right next to the border with Sweden. A tourist steamer went from Halden to the terminus at Skullerud.

Was in normal traffic from 1898 to 1960, when it was abandoned. Privat company until 1945, government run from 1945 until 1960 (from the 1930s the competition with trucks and busses has started killing of the traffic base). In 1966, enthusiasts reopened the section from the outskirts of Sorumsand to Fossum as a museum railroad, and it has been run as a museum railroad ever since.

Normally runs 3-4 trips each Sunday from the Sorumsand fair in early June until end of August, plus various extra tours - kindergartens, schools, visiting rail enthusiasts, and at various holidays - the New Year's tour e.g. pretty popular. Normal consist is 3-4 passenger cars and the engines, brimming full with people (on Sundays with good weather). Usually you only see freight cars on the MOW trains, which normally is pulled by their small gasoline locomotive.

Back in the day they had some pioneering concepts - like transloading from narrow gauge to normal gauge at Sorumsand using a portal crane lifting containers made of wood between narrow gauge cars and normal gauge cars. Portal crane is still there. And some weird traffic - like the containers of poop from outhouses in Oslo (in the pre-WC days) bound for farmers fields way up the line - not very popular loads to handle for the employees to handle, I am sure.

Today, the site at Sorumsand has a station, an engine shed, another shed, the portal crane etc. Trackage looks like this:

[Image: tertitten.jpg]

Smile,
Stein
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#10
steinjr Wrote:
RobertInOntario Wrote:Excellent shots! I assume this was a heritage train on an excursion or some kind of demonstration train?

Rob

Museum railroad - only 2 miles or so left of the original 30 miles of railroad.

Originally it was a a small feeder railroad, mainly for agricultural goods and lumber, but also doing passenger traffic. Known under the nickname "Tertitten" (derived from "tertiary railroad"). Financed by the local communities along the line to connect the Kongsvinger Line at Sorumsand with lake Skullerud 30 miles to the east. From Skullerud there were lakes, rivers and canals all the way down to Halden on the south coast, right next to the border with Sweden. A tourist steamer went from Halden to the terminus at Skullerud.

Was in normal traffic from 1898 to 1960, when it was abandoned. Privat company until 1945, government run from 1945 until 1960 (from the 1930s the competition with trucks and busses has started killing of the traffic base). In 1966, enthusiasts reopened the section from the outskirts of Sorumsand to Fossum as a museum railroad, and it has been run as a museum railroad ever since.

Normally runs 3-4 trips each Sunday from the Sorumsand fair in early June until end of August, plus various extra tours - kindergartens, schools, visiting rail enthusiasts, and at various holidays - the New Year's tour e.g. pretty popular. Normal consist is 3-4 passenger cars and the engines, brimming full with people (on Sundays with good weather). Usually you only see freight cars on the MOW trains, which normally is pulled by their small gasoline locomotive.

Back in the day they had some pioneering concepts - like transloading from narrow gauge to normal gauge at Sorumsand using a portal crane lifting containers made of wood between narrow gauge cars and normal gauge cars. Portal crane is still there. And some weird traffic - like the containers of poop from outhouses in Oslo (in the pre-WC days) bound for farmers fields way up the line - not very popular loads to handle for the employees to handle, I am sure.

Today, the site at Sorumsand has a station, an engine shed, another shed, the portal crane etc. Trackage looks like this:

[Image: tertitten.jpg]

Smile,
Stein


Thanks! It kind of reminds me of a narrow gauge steam and diesel train that we have in Huntsville, about a 2 hours drive north of Toronto. IIRC, this train (<!-- w --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.portageflyer.org">www.portageflyer.org</a><!-- w -->) used to transport people between two lakes in northern Ontario during the first half of the 20th century. It now operates as a tourist train on a very short length of track. It's quite neat to see the steam train operating. I even rode on this train as a child in the 1960s when it was operating as a tourist steam train in a different part of Ontario.
Rob
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#11
RobertInOntario Wrote:Thanks! It kind of reminds me of a narrow gauge steam and diesel train that we have in Huntsville, about a 2 hours drive north of Toronto. IIRC, this train (<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.portageflyer.org">http://www.portageflyer.org</a><!-- m -->) used to transport people between two lakes in northern Ontario during the first half of the 20th century.

Sure. I remember reading about it in either Trains Magazine or Classic Trains Magazine, which had a nice little article on the Portage flyer a few years ago - even showed the complete track plan for the whole railroad, and discussed the interaction between the steam boats on Peninsula Lake, the Portage Flyer and the steam boats on Lake of the Bays.

Smile,
Stein
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