Vigdis' train room
#46
A wonderful project and an excellent realisation. Congratulation!
Cheers, Bernd

Please visit also my website http://www.us-modelsof1900.de.
You can read some more about my model projects and interests in my chronicle of facebook.
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#47
Wow...great work so far! Really impressive work on that engine house.
Mark

Citation Latitude Captain
--and--
Lt Colonel, USAF (Retired)
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#48
Very nice indeed !
Mike

Sent from my pocket calculator using two tin cans and a string
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#49
Time for another update, this time it's about the foundation for the roundhouse. Here's the underside, showing how the inspections pits are built to get some extra depth:

[Image: 3032_w1200.jpg]

And here's the topside, work in progress. She has used cement based levelling compound with some gray paint mixed into it, the layer is about 1-1.5mm thick. You can see the guiding pins for the walls and divider wall posts. After the floor has been sanded and levelled out, it will be weathered for a more grimy and older look:

[Image: 3045_w1200.jpg]

Svein
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#50
I am somewhat concerned with the cement based levelling compound used. I am afraid it will be very difficult to sand and it looks like the top of the rails in lower than the surface. It might be a challenge to sand it at or lower than the top level of the rails. Might be I misinterpret the photos?
The wooden structure is extreme beautiful l!!!
Reinhard
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#51
No, you're quite right, parts of the track are covered by the compound, but it's easy to sand off again. If you look carefully at the picture above, you see that the right rail of the second track from the right has been sanded clear of the compound, and the rightmost stall floor has also been sanded down a little around the tracks. It's still only halfway done, and it requires some work, but it's not that difficult. The compound is not that much harder to sand than ordinary plaster, it just takes some time to get it done.

Svein
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#52
Svein Wrote:...The compound is not that much harder to sand than ordinary plaster...
Ok, I see. My "interpretation" of "cement based" was somewhat hard like concrete. I was afraid how you both sit down for month day and night to sand down concrete like material....
Reinhard
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#53
It contains some cement, but I think it's more like spackle compound, used for fixing cracks and holes in concrete, plaster walls and such. Found the data sheet here: http://media.schoenox.net/casco/docs/cas...1364498892

And here's the product information page: http://www.casco.eu/index.php?contentID=...tcatID=102
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#54
Here's a short video (6MB) from the test run of the first roundhouse track this morning. Must admit that after burying the tracks and painstakingly digging it out into the open again, it's nice to see that it actually works! Smile

Svein
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#55
That is a nice little video. Thanks for sharing.
Reinhard
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#56
Some prototype photos (Denver Railroad museum)

   

   

   

Note guard rails, locking mechanism operated by the "switch stand" on the table.
David
Moderato ma non troppo
Perth & Exeter Railway Company
Esquesing & Chinguacousy Radial Railway
In model railroading, there are between six and two hundred ways of performing a given task.
Most modellers can get two of them to work.
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#57
The roundhouse floor is finished. After sanding the floor, she used very thin washes of gray and black, before adding some black weathering powder along the walls and around the posts, and some light gray powder randomly on the floor:

[Image: 3059_w1200.jpg]

Next is fitting all the wall parts together. Between the posts and the rear walls there are small gaps, these will be filled with 12x12" sanded to fit and with a slight angle on one side. Here the 12x12" posts are cut to length and glued to the rear wall, sanding and fitting yet to be done:

[Image: 3063_w1200.jpg]

Svein
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#58
That looks very good! I am glad my concerns were for no reason.
Reinhard
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#59
Looking at the "before" and "After" of the engine house floor - - - - - - Thumbsup Thumbsup Thumbsup Thumbsup Thumbsup
And..... the weathering stands up beautifully in the natural sunlight. Worship Vigdis Worship

2285_ There is always a new *learning curve* to be enjoyed here! 2285_
And I always enjoy "a new learning curve". Big Grin Thumbsup Thumbsup Thumbsup
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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#60
Very good work - the shed!
But I must give an important addition and correction. An old and used steam engine shed has had not one place on bottom in an other color than black! With a few differences. The black and oily dirt was laying more or less thick on the bottom. And this was extremely thick in lines parallel to the rails. And also after a "cleaning" of bottom it was black - only thinner.
I was a engine shed worker while six years (steam engines) and I never have seen a "light colored" bottom in our engine sheds.
If you will like to set a few nuances you or Vigdis should set very dark and glossy spots for fresh oil or water to a dark gray and dull black bottom.
My suggestion for more realism. And I know that this does not look very attractively. Sorry for my view to reality.
Cheers, Bernd

Please visit also my website http://www.us-modelsof1900.de.
You can read some more about my model projects and interests in my chronicle of facebook.
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