HO vehicles-am I missing something?
#1
Since I have been working on my current layout,I have purchased a number of Classic Metal Works trucks and I have found
that only metal on these trucks are the screw or rivet that holds the cab to the frame and the wheel axles.
To me it just seem odd that the word "metal" in the product name would indicate more metal than just a screw and axles.
The only trucks that I have that are actually metal were made by Imex.
Perhaps I'm missing something here.
Let me hear your views.
"My railroad is a figment of my imagination"

BobS
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#2
Interesting observation,

A similar observation is in the bigger scales is a die cast replica of corvettes which in real life are fiber glass Icon_lol
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#3
Company names are not what they use to be.

Like Exact Rail, following the prototyle should be a requirement from their namesake, thought they didn't.
Tom

Model Conrail

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#4
Probably at one time their products were all metal. They found a cheaper or better way of manufacturing in plastic, and they went with it. But rather than lose brand recognition, they kept the same name. Same can be said for the Model Die Casting brand of trains. At one time, they were all die-cast metal. By the 1980s, they were mostly injection-molded plastic. Icon_lol Or how about the HO scale items sold by the "N-Scale architect"? Icon_lol At least "Mantua Metal Products" shortened their name to just "Mantua".
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#5
Good points. Makes you wonder how companies can get away with that sort of misrepresentation.
It's like we are not getting what we pay for.
If for example in my original post, if the trucks are not made of metal then that word should not be in the company name.
Anyway-just my 2 cents worth.
"My railroad is a figment of my imagination"

BobS
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#6
ZEBCO fishing rods and reels...Zero Hour Bomb COmpany Icon_lol
Charlie
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#7
Classic Metal Works vehicles were all cast at one time, the newer ones are mostly plastic, but still the best looking out there.



8-)
Andy Kramer - modeling the Milwaukee Road in Wisconsin
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#8
Plastic is the "new metal" , I suppose , in merchadise-speak Goldth Goldth

T
To err is human, to blame it on somebody else shows management potential.
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#9
Plastic is the new metal-sounds like 21st century alchemy. But I do agree that they are still good looking.
Also I want to apologize if I opened a can of worms with this blog.
"My railroad is a figment of my imagination"

BobS
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#10
I think that there is no intention to deceive, but accept that it is now purely a brand name - like Acme Metal Die-casters who haven't cast anything in acme metal since day one of the company coming into existance
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#11
We must also remember the cost and logistics involved with a business' name change. Very few of the model companies can afford that kind of expense.
Mike Kieran
Port Able Lines

" If the world were perfect, it wouldn't be " - Yogi Berra.
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#12
River Witch 14 Wrote:Plastic is the new metal-sounds like 21st century alchemy. But I do agree that they are still good looking. Also I want to apologize if I opened a can of worms with this blog.

357 Not to worry, they were, after all, only, "plastic" worms. :mrgreen: :mrgreen: Icon_twisted 357

When most of these companies started up, plastic, was a rare commodity. Athearn originally used embossed sheet metal sides and roofs for their kits. I still have one of their "steelside" kits in my "stash". ( unfortunately, not in the original packaging )
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#13
Again some very valid points.
I agree,the cost etc. of a company changing it's name would be high.
Ah yes, a can of plastic worms. They would also come in handy for catching plastic fish. 357
I guess in the end "it is what it is"
"My railroad is a figment of my imagination"

BobS
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#14
Catching plastic fish is easy ! The hard part is preparing them for cooking........you have to get ALL the mold release agent off their scales, or they taste horrible. Icon_twisted Wink 357 357 357

The plastic HO vehicles, are much easier to "modify" than the older metal ones. Here, one of the plastic "car-bodies-on-wheels"
got modified to a 1971 Dodge Challenger R/T :
   

There was a lot of " Add some styrene here, File off some part of the original casting there, body filler and file/sand new body to size and shape, paint, - - - before it was done.
This all was easier and quicker than trying to find an "existing" HO scale 1971 Dodge Challenger R/T.
We always learn far more from our own mistakes, than we will ever learn from another's advice.
The greatest place to live life, is on the sharp leading edge of a learning curve.
Lead me not into temptation.....I can find it myself!
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