Building the roundhouse at Mount Forest...
#16
Thanks, Matt. The screws were pretty-much a necessity, as some of the walls were warped. I also didn't want to trust glue alone to keep things intact, especially during construction, as it gets handled quite a bit.

Wayne
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#17
doctorwayne Wrote:Thanks, Matt. The screws were pretty-much a necessity, as some of the walls were warped. I also didn't want to trust glue alone to keep things intact, especially during construction, as it gets handled quite a bit.

Wayne

Wayne, do you have a closer shot of those screw. I'm curious. I'll have to build a cement plant in the upcoming months. The general design of the plant is similar to a roundhouse with track embedded in concrete slab and a superstructure on colums.

Matt
Proudly modelling Quebec Railway Light & Power Company since 1997.

Hedley-Junction Club Layout: http://www.hedley-junction.blogspot.com/

Erie 149th Street Harlem Station http://www.harlem-station.blogspot.com/
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#18
I'm not sure that these photos will show much of use. The screws are all flathead 1-72s, with the ones holding the walls together mostly 1/4" or longer, and the ones holding the .060" thick floor in place being 3/16" long. I used a #29 drill to countersink the screwheads. The visible ones will be covered with epoxy autobody filler.

   

   

   

   

   

Wayne
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#19
Your work amazes me Wayne. You make the best looking buildings and make them look so real.
We need a hundred people to give you the thumbs up you deserve.
Charlie
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#20
Thanks, Charlie, but I think that those screws may be a little out-of-scale for HO. Crazy I have some trepidation about the way that the roundhouse will look when it's finished, mainly depending on how the brick detail looks once it's painted and weathered.

Wayne
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#21
Well, there may have to be some extra downspouts... Goldth
Charlie
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#22
Wayne,

Any progress on this project?

Matt
Proudly modelling Quebec Railway Light & Power Company since 1997.

Hedley-Junction Club Layout: http://www.hedley-junction.blogspot.com/

Erie 149th Street Harlem Station http://www.harlem-station.blogspot.com/
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#23
Absolutely no progress on anything layout-related, Matt. My younger daughter and her husband have bought another house and I'm helping with reno work: complete kitchen tear-out, walls removed, re-routing ductwork, moving plumbing, re-wiring, patching and painting, etc., etc. Moving day is Dec. 28th, but move-in day will likely be sometime mid-January or later.

Wayne
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#24
doctorwayne Wrote:Absolutely no progress on anything layout-related, Matt. My younger daughter and her husband have bought another house and I'm helping with reno work: complete kitchen tear-out, walls removed, re-routing ductwork, moving plumbing, re-wiring, patching and painting, etc., etc. Moving day is Dec. 28th, but move-in day will likely be sometime mid-January or later.

Wayne

You just switched scale for 1/1. Though a little bit more intensive. Good luck, seems to be a big undertaking.

Matt
Proudly modelling Quebec Railway Light & Power Company since 1997.

Hedley-Junction Club Layout: http://www.hedley-junction.blogspot.com/

Erie 149th Street Harlem Station http://www.harlem-station.blogspot.com/
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#25
Well, just to take a break from a few other projects, I've revived (for now, at least) the roundhouse project, so have a little bit of progress to share.

I filled-in the countersunk holes for the screw heads, and then I skipped the rattle can primer step (mainly because I forgot that I was going to do it). Instead, I spent some time masking over the door and window openings and covering the tracks completely, then airbrushed all of the exterior walls with Floquil Reefer Orange - an entire bottle of it! I guess I shouldn't have skipped the primer. :wall1: :dumb1:
Before painting, I added a small annex onto the rear wall...it's from a Walthers kit, but don't recall which particular one. I'm calling it the foreman's office. There's not much real estate for some other things that should be included with a roundhouse, like parts storage, a steam plant, change room and showers for the employees, etc., etc.

The stonework was done with a mixture of PollyScale and Polly S paints, applied with a brush. It's not as dark in person as it appears in the photos, and will likely lighten considerably when I add the drywall mud "mortar".

[Image: 100_7172.jpg]

...here's the annex...

[Image: 100_7173.jpg]

I've left most of the masking tape in place, hoping to keep the drywall mud to the exterior of the structure...

[Image: 100_7170.jpg]

I also altered the Kingmill paper-on-styrene building flat in the background, cutting out one set of doubledoors to create an alleyway for pedestrians and the occasional automobile, and will add a crossing over the tracks....

[Image: 100_7174.jpg]

Once the mortar is done, I'll either paint the interior of the walls and the trusses, or perhaps apply some brick paper to the interior. I don't plan on adding too much detail, though, and definitely no lighting, but I can't leave it looking abandonned, as it's at eye-level and right at the edge of the layout where you enter the room.

After that, I hope to do the construction of the remainder of the trusses and the roof. I'm also puttering with the Walthers turntable, and have installed a motor and gear train, from a scanner, I think. I was going to use an old trainset transformer to power it, but I'm leaning towards using a wallwart with an AC output, and hooking-up one of my SCR throttles to give me both directional control and more precise movement, as there's no automatic indexing.

Wayne
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#26
Wayne, I am glad to see you back at this one. I know it will be very impressive.
Charlie
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#27
Still plugging away at the roundhouse, and I thought that I'd taken a photo of the "mortar" application, but can't find it. Anyway, here's the results of the application after the excess has been rubbed off...

[Image: 100_7178.jpg]

[Image: 100_7177.jpg]

[Image: 100_7179.jpg]

The window frame is just sitting in place - I won't install them until the interior has been painted.

A few days after finishing the mortar work, I decided to weather the brick, as I was concerned about how it would look. I used a wash of well-thinned PollyScale paint, with a couple drops of dish detergent added, applied with a 3/4" brush, then added the "soot" over the doors using artist's pastels. I simply rub the pastel stick on some coarse sandpaper, then dump the resultant powder into a suitable container, and use an old brush to apply it to the structure. Since it's unlikely to get much handling, no fixative was added....

[Image: Mount%20Forest%20roundhouse%20-%20weathered-1.jpg]

[Image: Mount%20Forest%20roundhouse%20-%20weathered-2.jpg]

[Image: Mount%20Forest%20roundhouse%20-%20weathered-3.jpg]

I need to do some additional work on the turntable: while the bridge and its track is now powered (SCR walkaround throttle, powered by a 9 volt AC wallwart for bridge operation, and track voltage through a reversing switch on the fascia for track power), the turntable bridge sits too low in the pit, with major bumps for anything entering or exiting the bridge. I think a washer of the proper thickness is all that's needed.

Wayne
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#28
The weathering really adds to it. Looking great. :tada: :tada:
Charlie
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#29
Nice work! :tada:
Mike

Sent from my pocket calculator using two tin cans and a string
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#30
The weathering makes a big difference!
Reinhard
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