Historic Railroad pictures.
#16
great series of photos  Applause
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#17
From a batch of slides I recently scanned for a friend. Shared with his permission. The last passenger train to stop in East Palestine, Ohio Sept, 1970.      Charlie
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#18
WOW !!!----thanks for sharing Charlie
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#19
(03-31-2019, 11:30 AM)Charlie B Wrote:

....The last passenger train to stop in East Palestine, Ohio Sept, 1970...



I'm guessing that the fireman is checking to make sure that they're still on the rails.  Sad to see when one thinks of what was there in Pennsy's heyday.

Wayne
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#20
(03-31-2019, 11:58 AM)doctorwayne Wrote:
(03-31-2019, 11:30 AM)Charlie B Wrote:

....The last passenger train to stop in East Palestine, Ohio Sept, 1970...



I'm guessing that the fireman is checking to make sure that they're still on the rails.  Sad to see when one thinks of what was there in Pennsy's heyday.

Wayne

"Glory days well they'll pass you by
Glory days in the wink of a young girl's eye
Glory days, glory days" Bruce Springsteen

great photo though I'm going to use it as wall paper  
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#21
Another picture scan from the Shone Collection shows this PRR freight westbound at Walker, Ohio, between East Liverpool and Wellsville, Ohio. The Locomotive is an Atlantic. 
Walker was a brick and sewer tile plant. My guess is from the late teens, early twenties.  There was a station at Walker and even with the huge amount of stack smoke (which apears to be going straight up) this train may be a combination stopped for passengers on the far end      
Charlie
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#22
nice photo . hope the general road foreman don't catch them making that much smoke unless there cleaning the flues. could be ww1  looks like the man in foreground is holding a rifle and there might be another guard mid train.
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#23
Here are a couple more interesting pictures of loads. Pulp stones, used to grind wood pulp for paper. Circa 1920          Charlie
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#24
Charlie---I'm really enjoying these historic photos---so much detail.In the latest shot I'm looking at those houses in the background with those steps from the road---imagine moving day and having to lift all your furniture  Eek
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#25
Yeah, those stairs look really scary. It would probably take me three days to go up a flight. Really impressive photos Charlie. I love old photos, maybe because I can still remember some of those things that you've been posting.
Don (ezdays) Day
Board administrator and
founder of the CANYON STATE RAILROAD
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#26
(12-04-2019, 06:04 AM)cn nutbar Wrote: Charlie---I'm really enjoying these historic photos---so much detail.In the latest shot I'm looking at those houses in the background with those steps from the road---imagine moving day and having to lift all your furniture  Eek

Forget moving day, imagine coming home with a couple bags of groceries and climbing those stairs. East Liverpool wasn't called the city of Hills and Kilns for no reason.  
The value of homes on hills in ELO is in the very low end, many have just been abandoned because folks want to be able to drive somewhere close. 
Charlie
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#27
Imagine coming home late after a few "pops" at the local saloon and climbing those steps---only to realize you're at the wrong house  Nope
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#28
(12-04-2019, 08:34 AM)cn nutbar Wrote: Imagine coming home late after a few "pops" at the local saloon and climbing those steps---only to realize you're at the wrong house  Nope

My vote for best reply!

Tom
Life is simple - Eat, Drink, Play with trains

Occupation: Professional Old Guy (The government pays me to be old.)
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#29
I guess we can learn something new every day. I was scanning some more pictures taken in 1912 and noticed this.  The bricks are made for use right up to the rail  as the flange way is formed with the brick rather than use rail with a flangeway cast in the rail. Probably nothing new to traction modelers but certainly new to me.     
Charlie
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