Where The Heck Did You Get That!?
#1
Everyone PLEASE take the time to read this article:

http://cs.trains.com/ctr/b/mileposts/arc...VnsBIO5gCM


It's about what Don, The other Moderators and I have been preaching since The Gauge began 19 years ago.

Interesting thing; a few weeks ago, I was perusing Facebook in our local history page and I see a photo I Took years ago on the local history site and the caption read: 
Does anyone remember the Baldwin locomotive Works in Eddystone?

i posted - Yeah - I DO, since I took this picture, Please give credit when you can!!!
I then attached the link to my website.

It was the picture below...  The "dark blob" to the left was a lens issue with the camera.
The car and clouds can not possibly appear in the same positions in any picture other then this one, so i know it was and is mine.

All the person had to do was include the link to my site.

...... The person never replied, or commented....  Oh well......... 

So, everyone, please be courteous on Big Blue and any other site you visit...
~ Thank You!!


Attached Files Image(s)
   
~~ Mikey KB3VBR (Admin)
~~ NARA Member # 75    
~~ Baldwin Eddystone Unofficial Website

~~ I wonder what that would look like in 1:20.3???
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#2
You (and Mr. Keefe) raise some good points, but it strikes me that many folks nowadays know little about copyright laws, and care even less about them.  Many seem to take for granted that if it's available on-line, it's free for the taking. 

In cases like that, especially if the photographer is not known (or you're too lazy to look it up), then you might be better off to provide a link to the photo, rather than simply assuming it's okay to use it.


There are numerous photo collections accessible on-line, too, and while the individual photographer is not always listed (many "collections" are exactly that), usually the owner of the collection is listed, and should be acknowledged.

An on-line acquaintance (whom I've never met), sends me 10 or 12 photos every day, from his own collection and from that of one of his now-deceased friends.  When known, the photographer is always named...otherwise, acknowledgement of the owner of the collection is provided.  I seldom, if ever, share those photos on line - they're strictly for my own enjoyment, or for use in modelling the subject of those photos. 
The only time I recall posting one of those photos here, I sought (and received) permission to use it.


(08-29-2019, 08:14 PM)ngauger Wrote:



........Interesting thing; a few weeks ago, I was perusing Facebook in our local history page and I see a photo I Took years ago on the local history site and the caption read: 
Does anyone remember the Baldwin locomotive Works in Eddystone?

I posted - Yeah - I DO, since I took this picture, Please give credit when you can!!!
I then attached the link to my website..........

All the person had to do was include the link to my site.

...... The person never replied, or commented....  Oh well......... 




And there's the problem and the reason that it exists......everybody's too busy or too self-important, so "Oh well" pretty well covers it.

Wayne
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#3
Unfortunately, a lot of people think that if it's on the Internet, it's free. Whatever it is, if they find a photo or something that someone has written, they feel they have the right to copy, modify or do whatever they please with someone else's material. Many grew up this way and don't know any different, others know better but don't care. Unless there is a way to change their thinking, such as establishing and enforcing penalties, then they will never change. Those that don't know better, need to read this and other articles about the subject of copyright issues and maybe that will be enough to make a change.

I like what Charlie does by stamping each of his photos, but even then, you have the thief that will erase or cut the copyright marks, knowing full well what they're doing is wrong. it's too easy today to modify a photo, erase that car, change the clouds or add something that doesn't belong there, and there's little one can do about that.
Don (ezdays) Day
Board administrator and
founder of the CANYON STATE RAILROAD
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#4
Big Grin 
At one time I thought I might some day sell some pictures, but I have come to realize I enjoy sharing them more. Most of my pictures are on the Fallen Flag site and George did major cropping on them because he likes only roster shots for modeling.  While I think roster shots for this purpose are fine, I find it funny that in a photo that all you see is a locomotive and a piece of track folks worry about the location.  Yes, I have found my pictures posted without my permission on a couple sites and I don't like it, but at the least I am given credit. 
I can count on the fingers of one hand the number of times I have been asked permission.  Photo's posted to the gauge can be used by any member non commercially as long as I get a little ego boost. At this point in life I can use all the ego boost I can get.  Icon_e_biggrin
Charlie
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#5
Many people also don't know that giving full credit is also a good way to learn more about the photo, who shot it and maybe find more. Over the year, you find out some particular subject were of special interest to a photographer and if you search by their name, you'll find more. Not giving full credit simply erase a good deal of invaluable data.

When I see the amount of available pictures online due to many railfans deciding to share their work, I think we should be grateful to them to some extent. It's a matter of courtesy.

Matt
Proudly modelling Quebec Railway Light & Power Company since 1997.

Hedley-Junction Club Layout: http://www.hedley-junction.blogspot.com/

Erie 149th Street Harlem Station http://www.harlem-station.blogspot.com/
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#6
I have a small collection of slides that I was given (no one else asked for them) and all I know is the names of the last 2 people who handled them.  I don't really know how to credit them.
David
Moderato ma non troppo
Perth & Exeter Railway Company
Esquesing & Chinguacousy Radial Railway
In model railroading, there are between six and two hundred ways of performing a given task.
Most modellers can get two of them to work.
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#7
I know from working with photos and negatives donated to the historical society that many times even the family doesn't know who the subject is or who took the photos. I don't feel in this case that posting these pictures in an effort to name the subject or credit the photographer is out of line. In the case of photos donated to a historical society I feel it a shame if they get locked in a vault in some historic building never to be seen. I am glad the president of the society and the majority of the members that I do the scanning for feel the same way. 

I am glad that the Barringer railroad collection and J J Young photos have been put on line for all of us to enjoy.  

A facebook group I belong to recently posted a picture of mine in an effort to find the photographer so they could get permission. In this case I wasn't offended because it was stated as such in the post and I even know the fellow that posted it.  I did not hesitate to allow them to use it. 

I have in my collection a group of black and white photos taken by a friend and his widow gave them to me with permission to use them.  I also have some pictures given to me 40 years ago by a friend in New Jersey that I share now and again. He had an extensive slide collection and I hope it too was saved when he died. 

Let this also be a reminder that there are people in the hobby that have relatives that think we are childish and frown on our habit so if you have friends and your family tolerates your quirks please make sure your collections of photos are safe.  

Also make sure any collections donated to historical societies remain the property of the society, not individuals in the groups. 

Charlie
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#8
I know of two look alike photos of 765 taken by two different people on two different days.. I took one and the other by another local railfan. Everything was the same except for a guy in a red ball cap.. After checking he was not in my photo.
Larry
Engineman
SSRy

“Shut one’s eyes tight or open one’s arms wide, either way, one’s a fool.” Flemeth-the witch of the Wilds.
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