Full Version: Found a photo to justify my locomotive :)
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
My favorite steam wheel arrangement is the 4-4-2.  Not sure why, maybe because they were quickly superseded by the 4-6-2 making them unusual.  

I found a Mantua 4-4-2 at a train show about 10 years ago, and paid about $10 for it.  It runs great, but lacks a few details.  However, I debated whether to letter it for my fictional railroad, or just leave it as-is.  I just couldn't picture a small Arizona shortline owning a 4-4-2.  In the universe of my fictional railroad, There was a line connecting Phoenix to Safford and the mining regions around there.  There was a proposed line, the Arizona Eastern, connecting those towns, but the last segment was never actually built.  

Yesterday I stumbled across this photo online of the opening of the Phoenix Union train station.  And lo and behold, an Arizona Eastern 4-4-2!

I could find a MDC SP cab to throw on my locomotive.  I have a Vanderbilt tender...
4-4-2 has always been one of my favorite loco's  for small passenger trains.
Jim
P.S. think i have a  cab . will look later.
Yeah nachoman,

if digging deep enough into history and hav a look around, you will find many astonishing things and (real!) facts. And sometimes what you want. Icon_e_smile

Will the rebuilding of this Mantua 4-4-2 into an Arizona Eastern Loco be the next challenge?


Lutz
Lutz,

I looked at it last night, and it would not be that hard to make the Mantua model be a stand-in for this locomotive by swapping out a few things and adding a few details.  But, since I am modeling a fictional road, I am not sure if I want to go that route.   I like the tender the Mantua came with, so I will just keep it.  I may swap out the cab, because the current one does not match well with the rest of my roster.  I will probably just add a few details and lettering, and an oil bunker for the tender.  Mostly I was just excited to see that shortlines in Arizona ran 4-4-2s.
Well, my first model locomotive ever was a Lionel C&O 4-4-2, so that is probably why I like the design. Started building a Bowser PRR E6 kit, but never finished it. I'm suspicious as soon as I do BLI will make one.
Well, I spent a couple hours drawing up a cab in Tinkercad to match the MDC Roundhouse Harriman cab.  Then I sent it off to David at http://www.3dptrain.com to have it 3d printed.   He's just starting his business, and I am quite impressed with what he is putting together.

Here is the result:

[attachment=36239]

He uses resin printers, and has much less markup for this printing method than other services.  He also has a marketplace that sells mostly narrow gauge 3d printed rolling stock.

I must say - I am quite impressed, and eager to see how it will look on my 4-4-2.
Well, I relocated the sand dome, added the new cab, swapped the compressor, added a few details....
Nice work on the details, Kevin.   Applause Applause Applause 

Wayne
Thanks Wayne. I think it will look great when I am all done. Just trying to decide what is a good level of detail considering my budget and amount of time. I was considering reconfiguring the running boards, but have since decided against it.
Kevin,

Thumbsup for this.


Lutz
Looking good!
I wish I had the patience, and ability, to do this. Worship
(05-14-2021, 06:44 PM)nachoman Wrote: [ -> ]....I was considering reconfiguring the running boards, but have since decided against it.
 
 

Yeah, on a metal boiler, that can be a bit of a job.  Where I wanted to put a stepped-up area to allow room for a water- or air-pump, I'd generally use a hacksaw to make the initial cuts, from their outboard edge, almost to the boiler.  I'd then grasp that segment with pliers, and simply break it off.  What was left was removed using a mill file.

To add the stepped-up portion, I'd drill fairly large holes (using small drill bits in a pin vise is miserable work on cast metal boilers) then use brass wire of the same diameter, forced into the holes, along with some ca or epoxy.  The portion of the wire that's left sticking out would have been worked-over with a file to flatten the top of the wire, and also to remove material from the bottom, so that it didn't look overly clunky. 

The raised step would be a piece of sheet brass, which could then be soldered onto the wires.

I later tried a slightly different method, still using a good-sized bit in a powered drill, but instead of using thick wire, I plugged the holes using suitably-sized styrene rod, secured with ca. 
The next step was to solder a couple pieces of phosphor-bronze wire (available from Tichy in a wide range of diameters) to the underside of the brass sheet.  This wire is considerably less-prone to bend than soft brass, so you can use a size that doesn't require thinning with files -.020" or .025" might be strong enough if you're careful when handling the locomotive.
For the final step, use the soldered-on wires to determine where you need to drill into the plastic plugs, in order to mount the new section of walkway - you can use a drill bit in a pin vise to drill the plastic (using an electric drill will make the hole too big if the drill's rpms can't be controlled).  When the wires are almost fully seated into the styrene plugs, apply a little ca to the still-visible portions of the wire, then push them home.

Here are a couple of photos of a Bowser PRR A-5 that I built for my good friend Charlie B., with a bump-up step added to match the set-up in a photo of the prototype...

[attachment=36355]

[attachment=36356]

While I cannot add photos directly to Big Blue from photobucket, I've discovered that by going to my photobucket albums, I can select a photo, then right click on it...a drop-down menu will appear, and near the bottom is an option to "view image info".
When I click on that, I get a page full of data, along with a partial view of the photo, and an option to "save as".  Clicking on that will place the photo into my desktop file for photos saved in the current year.  This is a lot easier than searching for the original photos, which are saved somewhere on a disc...some of them dating back 15 or 20 years ago.  The bonus is that the picture's file-size is automatically reduced to an amount useable for this Forum.

Wayne
(03-31-2021, 12:22 PM)nachoman Wrote: [ -> ]My favorite steam wheel arrangement is the 4-4-2.  Not sure why, maybe because they were quickly superseded by the 4-6-2 making them unusual.  

I found a Mantua 4-4-2 at a train show about 10 years ago, and paid about $10 for it.  It runs great, but lacks a few details.  However, I debated whether to letter it for my fictional railroad, or just leave it as-is.  I just couldn't picture a small Arizona shortline owning a 4-4-2.  In the universe of my fictional railroad, There was a line connecting Phoenix to Safford and the mining regions around there.  There was a proposed line, the Arizona Eastern, connecting those towns, but the last segment was never actually built.  

Yesterday I stumbled across this photo online of the opening of the Phoenix Union train station.  And lo and behold, an Arizona Eastern 4-4-2!

I could find a MDC SP cab to throw on my locomotive.  I have a Vanderbilt tender...

Did anyone notice the guy up on the light pole? No OSHA back then!
(5 hours ago)oldline1 Wrote: [ -> ]Did anyone notice the guy up on the light pole? No OSHA back then!

Yeah, he appears to be the only one working, while everybody else is just lounging around.

Wayne