TREE POINT a small layout module
#1
Over on another forum I took part in a layout design discussion, and introduced a couple of concepts for a small switching layout.
The layout is based on the modular standards we use in the UK currently, developed by the NMRA-BR and the RS Tower crew.

I will copy the first couple of posts about it here to bring you up to speed. :-)

I have named it Tree Point, WI.
Tree Point is a name generated by a 'random' place names generator I found online, and sounded good. It also sounds like '3 points', which is the exact number of points/switches/turn-outs on the layout .

It is designed as an End board, and can only be extended in it's current design on the left hand side. The boards will be build to the NMRA-BR spec for module boards which means they are 18" wide , and have the main track dead center (in this case only on one side). (By the way these specs were based on the RS Tower spec).

I haven't completely decided on the grain elevator industry. A mock up will eventually prove if there's sufficient space for it. If not I'll change it to something else. The Corn Syrup is a 100% definite, and the team track / loco spur I am also pretty certain off. The overpass is probably not happening either...

[Image: 10309646724_f7d3586634_b.jpg]
industrial Park V2B extended teamtrack and loco parking spur by K2K Koos, on Flickr

Koos
Be sure to visit my model railroad blog at <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.namrr.blogspot.com">http://www.namrr.blogspot.com</a><!-- m -->
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#2
Further to the plan:
this plan is 6 ft long, and 18" wide (two boards of 3feet each). I will probably make a traverser or at least a bolt on piece of track of about 1 ft at some stage to be able to switch more than one car at a time, but it is also designed to be able to be joined up to other NMRA-BR spec modules at the left side.

From here I started construction, using loft insulation board (extruded polystyrene) to which I glued fascia panels and head boards, and wooden frames to give it strength, and have something to attach legs and other things too in due course.

I used PECO code 83 flex rail and some no 5 switches, 3 in total, see where the name comes from? :-) I used number 5's to 'enforce' the perspective of a small industrial area, and to maximise on available space.

View from one side:
[Image: 10711848143_0cbd8673fa_b.jpg]
Tree Point by K2K Koos, on Flickr

And view from the other, note I've used pieces of PCB board to solder the rail to at the board ends (except the other side where the track isn't going to pass on to another board).

[Image: 10711662354_7365e5b293_b.jpg]
Tree Point by K2K Koos, on Flickr

Koos
Be sure to visit my model railroad blog at <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.namrr.blogspot.com">http://www.namrr.blogspot.com</a><!-- m -->
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#3
This being a small project on which I want to take my time, I decided I wanted to see how realistic I can make this commercial track look.

I therefore cut out most of the plastic webbing between the individual rail ties on the flex track, to give that added sense of 'air' below the rails, and removed some ties at random to create an uneven spacing, often seen in older run down industrial areas.. This had already happened by the time I took the photo's in my previous post.
I then proceeded to paint all ties with a variety of artist acrylic paints, and mixed and blended them as I went along over the ties, to get rid of most of that plastic shine.
After that I started to paint the track a dark rusty brown colour.

[Image: 12102411344_648d89da21_b.jpg]
Track painting by K2K Koos, on Flickr


Furthermore I decided that hand throwing the turnouts would be fine and add to the operational potential, so I installed Caboose Industries ground throws.

[Image: 11983429936_1d326c9c45_b.jpg]
Caboose hobbies ground throw by K2K Koos, on Flickr

Koos
Be sure to visit my model railroad blog at <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.namrr.blogspot.com">http://www.namrr.blogspot.com</a><!-- m -->
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#4
I wasn't quite sure how to hide the oversize PCB pieces on the module board joints that I used to hold the track in place better, so I've decided to hide these by adding a road here.
I used a cardboard sub bed, and on top of that I've glued styrene sheet. After painting this up I'll cut it through the middle using a sharp knife or razor saw, to that the road markings are on that line, hopefully hiding the joint a little.

[Image: 12307106894_49a63f2dc7_b.jpg]
Road construction by K2K Koos, on Flickr

And to bring you completely up to speed on this project, the road has received it's first base coat of grey paint. I'm also scribing the surface such that cracks in the surface can be simulated, and made more visual after a final wash of black india ink.

[Image: 12308812813_0c4d9489ba_b.jpg]
Road painting by K2K Koos, on Flickr

Koos
Be sure to visit my model railroad blog at <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.namrr.blogspot.com">http://www.namrr.blogspot.com</a><!-- m -->
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#5
This evening I've started ballast application, here's the first section, still soaking wet from water and white glue....

[Image: 12328479514_2f7d272993_c.jpg]
Ballast application to Tree Point by K2K Koos, on Flickr

and another view.

[Image: 12328046865_67074bcb71_c.jpg]
Ballast application to Tree Point by K2K Koos, on Flickr

The light colour ballast is a grey aquarium sand, and the brown is some left over 'Bush' Z scale ballast, which I deliberately used and blended in more and more towards the end of the module, so it would match the colour on my Wolter Springs module.

Koos

Koos
Be sure to visit my model railroad blog at <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.namrr.blogspot.com">http://www.namrr.blogspot.com</a><!-- m -->
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#6
Now that the ballasting is done, I've turned my attention to structures.

I have started on the corn syrup industry, for which I used parts of a Pikestuff kit. (the 2 stall engine house).

The space on the module is a bit too tight to use the full width and length of the building, so I reduced the width by about 1", and the length by half.

As Pikestuff is very recognisable with their blue and white colours, I painted mine using artist acrylics. A couple of fades on the walls to start with, and a solid grey colour on the roof. A lot more still needs doing, but the basic idea is here.

Next to the building I'll be modeling some syrup silos etc, and of course piping etc for the unloading facility. The view below is from the rear, with the unloading spur in the background.


[Image: 12619776195_36ea0afc3c.jpg]
Corn syrup building by K2K Koos, on Flickr
Be sure to visit my model railroad blog at <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.namrr.blogspot.com">http://www.namrr.blogspot.com</a><!-- m -->
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#7
Good, a non-"generic" contemporary industry that will take some effort to research and build.
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#8
Great to see Tree Point amongst these pages, Koos.

Quality modelling like this should be shared.

No need to say I'll be watching with interest :tada:

Jonte
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#9
A little bit of progress again:

[Image: 12660089634_7405edbc8e.jpg]
Corn syrup by K2K Koos, on Flickr

[Image: 12659752393_1be92ea7b9.jpg]
Corn syrup by K2K Koos, on Flickr

The toilet rolls are there to give me an idea how the silos (that I still need to build) are going to fit in the scene.

Koos
Be sure to visit my model railroad blog at <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.namrr.blogspot.com">http://www.namrr.blogspot.com</a><!-- m -->
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#10
I've started on a second small industry, just a general warehouse. This one has been build to fit the space using Pikestuff parts mostly.
The walls of the building have been painted with dilluted Artist acrylics, just like the previous building.
I managed to mix up a blue colour that is a close match for the pikestuff materials, but painting it as such get's rid of the plastic shine, and gives a good base for further dirt and grime weathering.

I did like a blue building, as I've seen many pictures of generic warehouses in the US build like that.

Here's a picture of the side of the building, the loose pic is a piece of stock Pikestuff wall, the building behind it is painted, as said, a very close match.

[Image: 12984657975_6e3d2d6f6f_b.jpg]
Untitled by K2K Koos, on Flickr

And here it is from the track side.

[Image: 12985071674_3cbdfa549d_b.jpg]
Untitled by K2K Koos, on Flickr


I've also just received some static grass and tufts etc, so I can do a bit of scenery work too. I've been browsing military modeling/war gaming websites for products, I found some real gems amongst these, not your usual bright green flocks etc, but much more subdued, which enhances realism. however average prices are higher...

Koos
Be sure to visit my model railroad blog at <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.namrr.blogspot.com">http://www.namrr.blogspot.com</a><!-- m -->
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#11
I like it,swiped a copy of your track plan to see if I can work it into my N scale Onandaga Sub layout. :tada:
Johnathan (Catt) Edwards
"The Ol Furrball"

"I'm old school,I still believe in respect"
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#12
hey Catt, have a look at my Flickr account, you'll get there by clicking on the track plan, you'll see some variations on the theme, that will also show you how I got to this one, one of those might be useful too!

;-)

Koos
Be sure to visit my model railroad blog at <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.namrr.blogspot.com">http://www.namrr.blogspot.com</a><!-- m -->
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#13
A little bit more construction has taken place on the warehouse. I've started the awning/roof over the loading platform.

I made the frame of styrene strips, a job that was made easier by my newest toy, a NWSL 'The Chopper' :-)


After painting this frame, I attached a metal roof using sheeds of corrugated metal by Northeastern scale lumber.

That of course still needs to be painted and weathered, to get a nice rusty look.


Here's a few in progress pictures.


[Image: 13130551123_966d241ecf.jpg]
Loading platform by K2K Koos, on Flickr


[Image: 13133030825_cd119b656a.jpg]
Warehouse roof by K2K Koos, on Flickr



Koos
Be sure to visit my model railroad blog at <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.namrr.blogspot.com">http://www.namrr.blogspot.com</a><!-- m -->
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#14
you got yourself a nice little project going here Cheers
My other car is a locomotive, ARHS restoration crew
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#15
Thanks to Reinhard, I'm partaking in a recycling project, and helped him find a new home for some of his photo laminate chicago themed brick buildings.

They are of good used for my midwestern themed Treepoint module. I've just received them, so I grabbed one of the boards, and started playing with placement.

I think this set up would work quite reasonably, I might need to work a little on the depth of the buildings to the left, to make a little more space for access at the front maybe.

[Image: 13887758459_6a2d3d40b0_b.jpg]
Suburban railroading by K2K Koos, on Flickr

Thanks Reinhard for your buildings, as you can see they have arrived safely !

Koos
Be sure to visit my model railroad blog at <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.namrr.blogspot.com">http://www.namrr.blogspot.com</a><!-- m -->
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