FREMO meeting in Zuidbroek/Netherlands
#16
Hey Zuidbroek! This one was part organised by one of my friends, Erik Wierenga from the Netherlands. He did a lot of the module planning as far as I know. The FREMO (not FREEMO, the near identical names are a coincidence, yes their both modular, but that's it, FREEMO stands for Free MOdular, while FREMO is a german abreviation for FReundeskreis Europaische MOdelleisenbahnen, or translated freely league of Friends of european modelrailroads)
developed their own modular system, initially based on a single track branch line, and all modules have profiles in various shapes that must fit, and some strict electrical standards, other than that , free to make them any length and shape, and usually operated in a point to point fashion.
I believe it took 9 months of prep and planning work for this large gathering.

Koos
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#17
This may be more than you need or want to know about Fremo "Standards" and how they allow what you've seen: http://www.fremo.org/uploads/media/24941_FREMO87_9e.pdf If I'm thinking correctly, FREE-MO is philosophically similar to the FREMO concept, but not a copy of the physical qualities...each has it's advantages for certain situations and users. The results of the craftsmanship and pre-planning are some truly spectacular displays, where tired feet and depleted camera batteries are often a visitor's only complaint. Thanks for the marvelous posts, Gentlemen. Bob C.
James Thurber - "It is better to know some of the questions than all of the answers."
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#18
Russ Bellinis Wrote:From what I've seen Fremo doesn't require squareness.

Squareness is rather boring 219 . Just compare the right leg with the dull straight to the left leg with a lot of angled modules on our small americaN layout in Schutterwald this spring.

[Image: americaN_Schutterwald2011_layout.jpg]

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Russ Bellinis Wrote:Basically they are given a space at a train show and how they choose to fill their allotted space is up to the Fremo club doing set up.

FREMO meetings are held for the fun of the FREMO members. They are private events without an audience. However individuals with an interest in realistic operation are always Welcome .
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#19
Hi All:
Now it makes more sense....9 months to get everything ready...and possibly using a CAD program to set it up.
Being an N-Trak modeler at our club, I think the FROMO or FREEMO is really a great layout technique and allows for a super interesting layout. Our problem would be a space problem, being in a building (even though we own it) we have a limited amount of space and have to give the major portion to the HO guys. So we try and work with three tracks and 2' deep modules to get plenty of scenry and still be able to have industries, yards, stations, and towns. Plus when we set-up it is usually at a show and we have a limited amount of time, 4-5 hours to get set-up and ready to roll and an equal amount of time to pack up and go. The other limiting show factor we encounter is we have to maxmimize our vendor space....which means we need to compress our layout space and do not enjoy the luxury of a really artistic FREMO style layout.
Anywat, Great Work by the FREMO guys.
dwight77
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#20
Hi Bob C:
Thanks for the link to the FREMO guidelines. We have some HO guys that have been talking about building some modules and this will be very helpful to them.
dwight77
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